State Medicaid and CHIP Eligibility Guidelines


The Affordable Care Act (also known as “Obamacare”) creates a national minimum eligibility standard of 133% of the federal poverty level (FPL), but some states choose not to adopt the Medicaid expansion under the ACA.

Listed below are the Medicaid and CHIP eligibility levels as a percentage of federal poverty level (FPL) in each state,1 including District of Columbia — as of January 2017.2

StateInfantsChildChildCHIPPregnantParents Adults
Alabama141%141%141%312%141%13%0%
Florida206%140%133%210% (1 – 18)191%28%0%
Georgia205%149%133%247%220%31%0%
Idaho142%142%133%185%133%21%0%
Kansas166%149%133%238%166%33%0%
Maine191%157%157%208%209%100%0%
Mississippi194%143%133%209%194%22%0%
Missouri196%150%150%300%196%17%0%
Nebraska213%213%213%N/A194%58%0%
North Carolina210%210%133%211% (6 – 18)196%38%0%
Oklahoma205%205%205%N/A133%38%0%
South Carolina208%208%208%N/A194%62%0%
South Dakota182%182%182%204%133%45%0%
Tennesse195%142%133%250%195%93%0%
Texas198%144%133%201%198%13%0%
Utah139%139%133%200%139%55%0%
Virginia143%143%143%200%200%33%30%
Wisconsin301%186%151%301% (1 – 18)301%95%95%
Wyoming154%154%133%200%154%50%0%

Among the 19 states not expanding Medicaid coverage, the median eligibility level for parents is just 44% FPL, with only three (3) states — Maine, Tennessee, and Wisconsin, covering parents with incomes at or near poverty.

Only Wisconsin is the only non-expansion state that provides full Medicaid coverage to adults without dependent children. Maine has passed a ballot initiative to expand Medicaid but it had not yet been implemented as of January 2018.


StateInfantsChildChildCHIPPregnantParentsAdults
Alaska203%203%203%N/A200%134%133%
Arizona147%141%133%200%156%133%133%
Arkansas142%142%142%211%209%133%133%
California261%261%261%317%208%133%133%
Colorado142%142%142%260%195%133%133%
Connecticut196%196%196%318%258%133%4133%
Delaware212%142%133%212% (1 – 18)212%133%133%
District of Columbia319%319%319%N/A319%216%210%
Hawaii308%308%308%N/A191%133%133%
Illinois142%142%142%313%208%133%133%
Indiana208%158%158%250%208%133%133%
Iowa375%167%167%302% (1 – 18)375%133%133%
Kentucky195%159%159%213%195%133%133%
Louisiana212%212%212%250%133%133%133%
Maryland317%317%317%N/A259%133%133%
Massachusetts200%150%150%300%200%133%133%
Michigan212%212%212%N/A195%133%133%
Minnesota283%5275%275%N/A278%133%200%6
Montana143%143%143%261%157%133%133%
Nevada160%160%133%200%160%133%133%
New Hampshire318%318%318%N/A196%133%133%
New Jersey194%142%142%350%200%133%133%
New Mexico300%300%240%N/A250%133%133%
New York218%149%149%400%218%133%200%6
North Dakota147%147%133%170%147%133%133%
Ohio206%206%206%N/A200%133%133%
Oregon185%133%133%300%185%133%133%
Pennsylvania215%157%133%314%215%133%133%
Rhode Island261%261%261%N/A253%133%133%
Vermont312%312%312%N/A208%133%133%
Washington210%210%210%312%193%133%133%
West Virginia158%141%133%300%158%133%133%

  1. Eligibility levels reflect MAGI converted income standards that include a five percentage point disregard and are subject to change
  2. Medicaid.gov, Medicaid and CHIP Eligibility Levels for for Adults, Children, and Pregnant Women
  3. In Virginia, eligibility levels for parents vary by region. The value shown is the eligibility level for Region 2, the most populous region.
  4. Connecticut decreased eligibility for parents and caretaker relatives as of January 1, 2018.
  5. Minnesota covers children up to age 2 with income up to 283% of the FPL.
  6. Adults with incomes between 133 and 200% of the FPL are covered through the Basic Health Program.